Volumetric Weight by Michael

Procuright Explain Volumetric Weight

As a general rule, the cost of sending a parcel will be affected by which is the greater weight between the actual weight and the volumetric weight. To get the actual weight of a parcel, pop it on a set of scales (although nothing we can buy as consumers will be as accurate as the scales used by a domestic or international courier company). To get the volumetric weight (the amount of space that a package occupies on a van or aircraft etc.) you need this calculation;

Length X Width X Height Divided by 5000

It may seem unfair initially that a domestic or international courier company calculates costs in this way but if you can imagine a lightweight bike frame totalling just 1kg (including packaging) for its actual weight, that measures (when put into its box) 90cm X 30cm X 70cm (divided by 5000) actually totals a Volumetric Weight of 37.8kg (which would be rounded up to 38kg by a domestic or international courier company). An item with these measurements would take up a lot of space on a vehicle so for parcels like this, it's understandable why carriers such as DHL, FedEx, UPS and TNT need to use these type of calculations (TNT actually use a slightly different formula for their Economy service which is divided by 4000).

So, there's a golden rule to remember when sending international parcels or sending UK parcels; always package your items tightly (without compromising on essential padding/ safety of your goods) or you could find yourself paying a higher price than you should be.

When sending a parcel through us, our online shipping portal calculates the volumetric weight of your package, so you don't need to do these sums each time just to get an accurate and instant price.

Awkwardly shaped packages (sometimes known as Ugly Freight within the industry) can be tricky for the unwary shipper. Volumetric weight is always calculated on the nearest conventionally square package size your item or items "fit" into. Rather than using a standard square box and paying for all the unused space, consider checking to see if specialist packaging companies offer more suitably shaped solutions. Bulging boxes are also something to be wary of if you're relying on accurate quotes from domestic or international courier companies; their measurement systems (lasers) are brilliantly accurate but will measure "the bulge" as the outer most point of your box/ parcel - not the nice right angle that we're all tempted to rest our tape measures on.

So, there's a golden rule to remember when sending international parcels or within the UK; always package your items tightly (without compromising on essential padding/ safety of your goods) or you could find yourself paying a higher price than you should be